Lentil – 8000 Years Of Healthy Tradition Of An Antique Crop For Modern Times

The lentils correlate to the group of beans, commonly with beans and peas. The petals are white, violet or pale blue, from which they develop grains that contain 1-2 seeds.

It has arisen in the Stone Age, and it is considered that it originates from southwestern Asia, from where it spreads within the Mediterranean, to Europe.

It is assumed that this was the first food that began to grow. It was found 8,000 years ago and was also found in the tombs of the Egyptian pharaohs. The ancient Greeks and Romans also cultivated it, and it is also mentioned in the Bible.

The energetic value of 100 grams of raw lentils is 60% of carbohydrates, 25.8% protein, and 1% fat. As for the minerals, lentils contain calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, manganese and selenium, and vitamins-vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6 and vitamin K.

It positively affects the nervous system due to the high amount of vitamin B complex, and iron which help in the prevention of anemia.

Always buy in a dry form. When purchasing, make sure that the seeds are complete. Keep it in a closed container in a cool and dry place. For easier digestion, place it in hot water.

It’s excellent when it is combined with tomatoes, onions, garlic, meat products, olive oil, and goat cheese. It can be served as a prime meal, in the form of stew or soup, but also combines with pasta, lettuce, etc.

In India, there is a so-called thick yellow lentil soup, Bengali dhal, which is, due to the addition of chili peppers and raisins, at the same time it is sweet and sour.

In Arabic cuisine is usually combined with bulgur wheat and rice. The French prepare it with salad, fresh figs, and raspberries, as well as hot goat cheese. Italians, in turn, use it to cook pasta in combination with sausages, olive oil, parsley, and parmesan.

In India, there is a so-called thick yellow lentil soup, Bengali dhal, which is, due to the addition of chili peppers and raisins, at the same time it is sweet and sour. In Arabic cuisine is usually combined with bulgur wheat and rice.

The French prepare it with salad, fresh figs, and raspberries, as well as hot goat cheese. Italians, in turn, use it to cook pasta in combination with sausages, olive oil, parsley, and parmesan.